IP Scrambler – Scramble Your IP Address

Scramble Your IP Address
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Each time you connect to the internet with any device, an IP address is assigned. They can be permanent or temporary, but without one there’s no way to get to the internet.

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Whenever you connect to a particular website, server, or application, the IP address is sent out as an identifier. While they may seem as just a combination of numbers (or, in some circumstances, letters as well), IP addresses can reveal a lot of information about you.

 

Websites and servers can see what geographical location the IP address originates from with at least city-level accuracy. Additionally, the Internet Service Provider can be discovered as well. As such, regular browsing is not as anonymous as one might think.

 

In fact, information from IP addresses is utilized constantly. For example, many websites and service providers display different content based on the geolocation acquired from IP addresses. Using an IP scrambler can help bypass region-locked content restrictions.

What is an IP scrambler?

An IP scrambler can be anything that changes the original IP address of a device. Generally, the scramblers are an intermediate server called a proxy. Connections to the destination are initiated to the source by the intermediary.

 

While it may seem overly simplistic, the most important aspect is that the destination server sees the connection as if it originated from the intermediary. As a result, the website or server displays content for the IP address.

 

Additionally, it hides the IP address of the original device. There are ways it can be uncovered, however, these would require in-depth investigations, which only happen in highly unusual and extreme cases.

 

One key difference between a proxy and a scrambler is that, with the latter, IP addresses are changed after every request. Almost every single user takes advantage of a proxy switcher that automates the process. Thus, instead of having one static path of routing, scramblers utilize many proxies to keep changing IPs, making it nearly impossible to track the user’s internet activity.

 

Websites and servers can see what geographical location the IP address originates from with at least city-level accuracy. Additionally, the Internet Service Provider can be discovered as well. As such, regular browsing is not as anonymous as one might think.

 

In fact, information from IP addresses is utilized constantly. For example, many websites and service providers display different content based on the geolocation acquired from IP addresses. Using an IP scrambler can help bypass region-locked content restrictions.

How does an IP scrambler work?

Most IP scramblers work in a fairly similar fashion. Instead of connecting to your desired website or server directly, the device first routes internet traffic to the intermediary proxy server. It then connects to the destination as usual.

 

Depending on the technology used, slightly different results can be achieved. There are many ways to differentiate the methods, such as HTTP(S) or SOCKS5, however the most important distinction is between a datacenter and a residential proxy server.

 

A residential proxy server is an IP address that comes from household devices that are attached to a physical location. Anything, from a personal computer to a smartphone, can become a residential proxy if it’s connected to the internet. 

 

While they provide a household IP, they have the drawback of being unreliable and slower than their counterparts. Since only the owners of the device control the proxy, it can go down at any moment.

 

Datacenter proxies, on the other hand, are IP addresses created through servers owned by businesses. They are generated through virtual machines. While getting an IP from a particular geographical location might be slightly more difficult, datacenter proxies enjoy a whole host of benefits over residential ones.

 

First, they are much more reliable, because they are owned by businesses. They run a multitude of operations through data centers, therefore, they have an incentive to keep them running 24/7. As a result, IP pools are extremely unlikely to ever go down.

 

Additionally, as they are business-owned, they enjoy much higher internet connection speeds. Companies generally get specialized deals from Internet Service Providers. These deals include better speeds and reliability all around.

 

Finally, datacenter IPs are a lot more configurable. Most residential ones are also rotating proxies by default, because most IP addresses cannot be maintained for extended periods of time. With datacenters there is no such issue. You can use proxy rotation as much or as little as needed. 

 

At Razorproxy, we have tailor-made our datacenter IPs for anonymity and for privacy online. Our shared proxy servers are the perfect fit as they have both automatic rotation and static IPs. Additionally, as they are priced per traffic, users get an unlimited number of proxy servers, making it perfect for IP scrambling.

Is an IP scrambler illegal?

In almost all cases, using an IP scrambler is not illegal. In fact, there is probably no direct legislation for IP scramblers. You should, however, always consult with a legal professional before using such tools.

 

Additionally, it’s worth noting that some countries, while they have not directly legislated IP scramblers, they have laws regarding VPN server and proxy use. If using such software is illegal, then, by definition, an IP scrambler is illegal as well.

 

Finally, third parties have some control over the legality of IP scrambling as well. Companies can use Terms of Services in order to forbid internet connections with the use of proxies and VPN servers. Breaking Terms of Services is not recommended, as it can lead to a ban or even a lawsuit.

Alternatives to an IP scrambler

There are two primary alternatives to proxy-server-based IP scramblers – VPNs (virtual private network) and Tor services. While the underlying technology is nearly identical, they do have some vital differences.

 

We should note that neither can truly beat a good IP scrambler that sends web requests through a rotating proxy server pool. VPN services and Tor can only work as a short-term solution.

VPNs

VPN services use much of the same technology as do proxies. They provide an intermediary server that manages the web requests of all devices connected to it. There are a few key differences, though.

 

VPNs are created with a non-tech-savvy user in mind. As such, developers spend a lot of time developing user interfaces, guides, and manuals. While it makes VPN software a lot easier to use, it also places limitations on it.

 

For example, integrating VPN services into other software and applications is extremely difficult, IP scramblers included. It’s simply not intended for such a purpose. In fact, in some cases it could be simply impossible.

 

Additionally, VPNs route all of the traffic through the server. There’s usually no way to choose a single application. All of the traffic is encrypted and sent through the VPN connection before reaching the destination. In many cases, scrambling all traffic is not necessary and just slows everything down.

 

They do, however, have some unique benefits that are hard to get from proxies. The two primary benefits are a kill switch and obfuscated servers. Kill switches let users automatically terminate traffic if the connection with the VPN server is dropped. That way they can ensure that no traffic “leaks” from the original device.

 

Obfuscated servers are attempts to make VPNs look like residential proxies. While the benefit might be debatable, it’s a step towards better IP scrambling.

 

All in all, VPNs are intended for general users who just want to access region-based content or protect their anonymity in a very basic way. They are generally not that great at serious IP scrambling.

Tor

Tor Network is a volunteer-based relay system that uses Onion routing to obfuscate messages. It is a great way to hide your IP address if you don’t care that much about connection speeds and don’t want to build your own scrambler.

 

The network is based on thousands of network nodes, each of which are called an onion router. Whenever the user wants to send a web request over the network, it is first encrypted in multiple layers. The encrypted web request is then sent to the first relay.

 

Unlike with proxies and VPNs, however, the first relay doesn’t have the capability to encrypt the entire web request. It can only discover where it originated from and where to send it next. Of course, the relay sends the web request to the next one. And so the process continues until it reaches the final relay. It can encrypt the final destination.

 

Onion routing is great for anonymity, because no one relay ever knows the true contents of the request being sent. While it’s not as great as rotating proxies, the technology has proven itself to be extremely powerful.

 

Of course, security agencies have discovered ways to detect the original sender. However, it takes a lot of effort and tracking to do so. If you’re just looking to hide your IP address, Tor is great at it.

 

It does have one primary disadvantage, though. As the network is made up of volunteer-based relays scattered all across the world, the speeds are anything but good. Since the message needs to travel through several, mostly household, computers on different ends of the world, there is no way it can even be made fast.

 

As such, while the technology is impressive, the speeds are not. It can even take a couple of minutes to load a relatively simple web page. That makes Tor only good if you want to hide your IP address during leisurely browsing. It’s nearly impossible to apply it to serious research or any business case.

Conclusion

An IP scrambler can be one of the most powerful internet anonymity  tools in anyone’s arsenal. It does, however, require fast and reliable proxies with a large enough pool. All of the alternatives are comparatively weak ones that are not suitable for serious use.

 

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